Anthony Giffen
How giving stuff away for free pays off for you

goodideaexchange:

image

Years ago, I became interested in the band The Black Keys. I’m a fan of blues music and alternative rock, and The Black Keys are heavily influenced by those types of music, too. I searched around the Internet to listen to some of their music, with the intention to buy, when I came across – FREE MUSIC. They’d taped a gig they did at some small club and made the music available for free download. I liked their music and downloaded everything they gave away. I listened to the tracks over and over again. Pretty soon, I was hooked on their sound and I’m still hooked on their sound today.

As a result of downloading a bunch of their songs for free, I’ve bought all of their albums, seen them in concert and even followed their side projects. I’ve shared their music in the My Jukebox section of my personal blog, The Writehouse. And if anyone asks me which rock band is the best on the planet, I don’t hesitate in answering The Black Keys.

I’m not a fan of The Black Keys because they gave me free stuff. I’m a fan of them because they’re the best rock band on the planet. I give them my business because they’re the best rock band on the planet. I give them my loyalty because they gave me free stuff.

I love The Black Keys’ business model as much as I love their music. I even use it myself. Frequently, I’m asked to lend my writing talents for a price. In some circumstances, I lend my talents for free, even to influential people who can easily afford my rates. Why would I do that? Because I’ll create a loyal customer for the long-term. Sure I paid for it by giving up some short-term revenue, but I’ll make back that paltry price in the long run by keeping close to my loyal customer, who’ll no doubt tell others about my great service.

This model even works when influencing others. By going above and beyond what followers expect, you also foster strong relationships. Every leader depends on strong relationships to get things done. Surprising people with your generosity and kindness will earn you a giant crowd of loyal followers who’ll look forward to returning the favor to you someday.

The Black Keys are great musicians and great businessmen, too. The lesson they can teach us is never lose sight of the big picture. If you give people something for free now, they might just buy more stuff from you in the future. They might tell all of their friends to buy your stuff, too. They might even know someone who can help you in your future career endeavors.

Giving a little bit of yourself for free now can pay off big for you in the future.

Image: http://www.nonesuch.com/artists/the-black-keys

krist0:

#life#leadership

krist0:

#life#leadership

Together we can create what none of us can imagine.
Ag
You can implement a new process. It’s probably a very good process. But it’s not good enough to overcome stupid.
Ag

“Improvisation for the Facilitator”

Thursday, June 27, 2013

5:30 p.m. – 8:45 p.m.

Location:  Crowne Plaza - Orlando

Program Description:      

The rules and tools used by improvisational performers on stage allow them to create dynamic, original content in the moment in front of live audiences. While the thought of getting up on stage without a script terrifies most of us, the truth is we all live our lives “up on a stage without a script” every single day. So the rules and tools used by improvisational performers just might help all of us feel a little more comfortable being “in the moment” in our workplaces. 

In this session, Anthony Giffen will lead participants through improvisational warm-ups, exercises, and simple games in a safe, embarrassment free environment (No, you won’t be brought up on a stage!). Anthony will also illustrate how training and and development professionals can transfer improvisational theater skills to improve facilitation in classroom and meeting environments.

Anthony Giffen is a Learning and Development Consultant who has been leveraging his background in improvisational theater in a variety of human resources, theme park operations, consulting, and training roles for the past fifteen years. He has a loyal social media following and his leadership tumblr can be found at anthonygiffen.tumblr.com.

wellthatsjustgreat:

Most individuals imagine their value to their organization is greater than it likely is.

“This place would fall apart without me!”

Most organizations tend to underestimate the value of the individuals in their organization.

“No one is irreplaceable. Our success is the result of the combined efforts of the team, not of any one or two individuals.”

The true value of an individual to the team usually lies somewhere in between, but it is the gap between the perceptions that is the biggest problem.
The bigger the gap, the bigger the problem.
All people want is to be recognized and appreciated appropriately for the work that they do. As both a leader and as a member of other leaders’ teams, I have seen that leaders who can narrow or close this “perceived value gap” will see measurable increases in productivity, higher retention rates, and much higher morale.
Ag

wellthatsjustgreat:

Most individuals imagine their value to their organization is greater than it likely is.

“This place would fall apart without me!”

Most organizations tend to underestimate the value of the individuals in their organization.

“No one is irreplaceable. Our success is the result of the combined efforts of the team, not of any one or two individuals.”

The true value of an individual to the team usually lies somewhere in between, but it is the gap between the perceptions that is the biggest problem.

The bigger the gap, the bigger the problem.

All people want is to be recognized and appreciated appropriately for the work that they do. As both a leader and as a member of other leaders’ teams, I have seen that leaders who can narrow or close this “perceived value gap” will see measurable increases in productivity, higher retention rates, and much higher morale.

Ag

glitterforbreakfast:

Click through to read the full interviews!